Month: August 2017

Lights! Coffee! Music!

older-couples-lets-dance (How I might look)

You know how filming movies starts with “Lights! Camera! Action!”?  For me, moving into my day starts with “Lights! Coffee! Music!”  I can rise at any hour if I really NEED to, if there’s a specific thing I’ve committed to do at a specific time that requires the early exit out of dream-land.  However, I am naturally a late-riser.  I’m not proud of the fact.  In my milieu “sleeping-in” tends to be looked down upon.  But I’m no longer truly ashamed of the fact that my natural wake time is 9:00 a.m.  I’ve always been this way.  Although most of my life has required I get up around 6:00 a.m. and I have managed my sleeping and waking accordingly, now that I am “retired” from “external commitments” I let myself return to my natural rhythms.  I usually stay up until mid-night or 1:00 a.m..  My body seems to prefer 9 hours sleep.  Whatever my waking hour, get me going is greatly facilitated by music.  When I hear music, it is as if the interior, essential Me wakes up; without music, much of me remains dormant.

I’m thinking about this because my “hot spot” or area where I need to work on bringing a healthful balance into my life is my physical health.  On my scales at home I weigh 165.  At the doctor’s office I weigh 159.  (I think they should really record 160, but the nurse is likely sympathetically taking a low reading!)  I used to be 5 feet 3 inches, but I’m a little bit shorter now.  I have a smallish frame (bone structure).  So I think my ideal weight would be around 115.  In college I weighed 110-115 and I felt great.  I ate well and I was naturally very active.  By “naturally” I mean that my daily activities incorporated a great deal of walking and other gentle-yet-constant activity.  I would be very happy to lose 40-50 pounds of fat, and gain some muscle weight.  I don’t really care what number the scale reads, I just know I need to lose fat from my midriff.  And I’d like to be physically stronger.

The approach I believe I SHOULD take in addressing my health is to eat better and to incorporate regular exercise into my daily routine.  So why don’t I do this?  Why haven’t I done it yet?  Simple answer: because other things have been a priority.  Why aren’t I doing it now?  Well, I’m starting to look directly at the issue; so, there’s no more “not doing it.”  Even so, my top priority is addressing my emotional health, healing my self-regard.

I think this is a good ordering of priorities because I’ve noticed that now that I am letting myself put my Self as my top priority, I have had more energy in general.  I “feel like” doing more things.  I want my approach to all self-care to be one born out of love and joy, not fear or shame or obligation.  I want to develop an attitude of joy and celebration in feeding myself, rather than dreading food as a danger.  I want my chosen modes of movement to be just that rather than dreading dutifully doing demanded daily drudgery!  So what’s my next step?  Find a great dance-inducing CD, and dance!  As for eating: find a few recipes for easily combined fresh ingredients.  Maybe have a theme for each day.  Somehow make the plan fun.  Maybe more on that next post.  Time to dance!

children dancing (How I feel!)

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The Power of Peer Support

Farm Friends Rob MacInnis

Support Network

It is important not to try to recover in a vacuum. You do need help from like-minded and empathetic survivors and trained professionals.. . Learning to trust others and to turn to them for support is a crucial step in recovery. Doing so challenges one of the basic notions that arises from a history of abuse: namely, that people are dangerous.  [from ASCA “Survivor to Thriver” on-line workbook]

The ASCA workbook suggests listing “everyone you can think of whom you can call for support during times of need.”   I won’t list people by name here, but on my list I’ve included a few people from my family, friends, and ASCA group.

I am grateful I have people in my life I can trust.  Just knowing I can trust them makes a significant difference in my experience of being in the world.  Gaining some experience with ASCA, I was inspired to begin a similar support group/session with a friend.  Finding this kind of peer-support to be so helpful, I decided to begin this blog.  For me, blogging about my experience is a part of shattering the vacuum that can shackle victims to faux-shame.

If you, dear reader, have experienced any kind of violation or abuse, I encourage you to get not only whatever professional help you might need, but equally importantly: find peer support.  While professional therapy has its own merits, I have found peer support to be more effective in terms of freeing me from the “vacuum.”

Safety Action Strategies

Awareness-Assessment-Action

Action Worksheet (from Online Survivor to Thriver Workbook by ASCA)

Actions I can take to help me restabilize myself after feeling unsafe:

  1. Leave the space or situation entirely.
  2. Excuse myself to the bathroom if I think I might want/need to return temporarily.
  3. Avoid people/ places I know will feel dangerous to me.
  4. If it’s a trust-worthy person who innocently does something that makes me feel threatened, tell them asap what behavior I request they avoid; I don’t need to say why.
  5. After I’m away from whatever made me feel threatened, pray and write about what I felt and/or how I am now okay.  I.e. concretely affirm my safety and that I deserve to be safe.
  6. Remember to breathe.
  7. When in a safe place, do something physical to burn off the adrenaline that was probably triggered.

This exercise is also difficult.  It’s painful to think about these things.  It’s also frustrating and discouraging that I have to in a sense make my world smaller.  I think I need to re-frame how I think about how I address making myself safe.  Rather than seeing my world as smaller, I could simply recognize that everyone has places or conditions they have to avoid.

For example, most humans would avoid certain situations at least without proper gear and preparation, such as:

  • swimming out into the deep of the ocean or a turbulent part of a river
  • moving quickly near the edge of a cliff
  • driving the wrong way on a one-way road
  • walking through poison ivy or a fire-anthill or any identified toxin

In other words, we can still swim if we know and accept what conditions we need for safety.  We can look over a cliff if we are careful.  We can drive the direction we need to if we take the appropriate road.  We can walk through the woods, desert, or where-ever there are small dangers if we remain alert and avoid those limited threats.

Another note: I’d like to have more strategies for dealing with triggers/ “toxic” situations.  This is something I can work on.

Triggers

Awareness-Assessment-Action

Assessment Worksheet (from Online Survivor to Thriver Workbook by ASCA)

Triggers that make me feel threatened or endangered:

  1. Small spaces
  2. Spaces with only one exit
  3. People standing too close to me
  4. Anyone standing directly behind me
  5. Anyone touching my head
  6. Certain smells
  7. Certain postures by men
  8. Certain people (the man who abused me, any man who looks or acts like him in any way, anyone who I know associates regularly with him)
  9. Certain phrases — even if they sound positive — if they refer to me being subordinate, I cringe inside and find it difficult to go on without correcting/ censoring the person
  10. Lots of common scenarios in Public Schools; I don’t ever like being in a public high-school building

This exercise is difficult.  I find myself resisting thinking about triggers.  My mind wants to glance off any uncomfortable remembrance.  I find my mind wandering to other things.  I can feel my body getting tense.

 

 

On Self-Acceptance and Being

How I Feel Right Now Having Written “Signs of Danger”

I felt extremely uncomfortable while writing my list of things I’m aware of when I begin to sense my safety could be threatened.  To write the list I had to remember times when I felt potentially threatened, so I also felt the sense of threat.  But now that I’ve published the list, I feel somehow more powerful.  It feels good to recognize that I don’t feel any fear or shame in acknowledging that I can feel threatened or helpless in certain situations.

I think one of my Big Goals in Life is to reclaim my sense of Belonging.  Not to someone or a group or a place, but to Life.  Affirming my own Existence.

Oh, praise be Jesus!  Yes!  Just saying “I belong!” or “I affirm the goodness and rightness of my existence!” floods me with a feeling of well-being.  Praise be Jesus forever and ever!  I credit the Lord with my ability to recognize the Goodness and Rightness of my Being.  It’s absolute, because the Lord’s embracing of Life is absolute.  This is something I know in my soul.  It really can’t be explained in words.  Oh, I’m sure theologians and other spiritual writers can try to dissect the thought/ phenomenon.  But I’m not really pointing to a thought or idea or even phenomena.  I’m referring to a mystical posture.  I have discovered within myself “where” my soul rests in the Lord’s Spirit.

This makes me smile.  Nothing is really needed beyond this.  And yet, while I am here on Earth, in the body, some to-doing is required.  I can’t just sit around in blissful contentment that God loves me!  Part of me would like to depart from here to Heaven sooner rather than later, even now.  But that’s the part of me that would like to avoid suffering.  And the odd thing is is that, in my experience, this “posture of bliss” doesn’t exempt me from suffering.  In fact, it has been through suffering that I discover the depth and breadth of this “posture.”  It is in communing w/ my Lord Jesus Christ in prayer during times of suffering that I experience the healing and sustaining flow of Christ’s unconditional Joy.  Knowing I am loved no-matter-what produces a Joy that nothing can squelch.

This is part of why I call it a mystical “posture.”  It doesn’t have to do with doing or solving anything; it is simply being in the Lord’s Presence.  Oh! And He welcomes me so graciously and tenderly and with such Joy!  Hallelujah!

Signs of Danger

Awareness-Assessment-Action

Awareness Worksheet (from Online Survivor to Thriver Workbook by ASCA)

Physical/ emotional/ intuitive signs that tell me I might be in danger:

  1. I feel trapped, like a caged wild animal; I want to leave but I don’t know how.
  2. My physical movement looks inhibited (someone is blocking a path of exit).
  3. I feel nervous (my body feels like it needs to move suddenly/ randomly).
  4. I feel anxious, like all my veins are electrified; I think it’s adrenaline flooding me.
  5. My heart begins to race.
  6. I find it suddenly harder to focus.
  7. I feel agitated.  This starts more as an intellectual thing, but quickly overwhelms me emotionally.
  8. My stomach hurts.
  9. I suddenly have diarrhea.
  10. I feel awkward, like I don’t really belong in the group/ situation.
  11. Certain smells make me want to flee.
  12. The presence of a few specific people would make me want to immediately leave.
  13. I suddenly feel some kind of faux-shame, but there’s no reason for it.  (My body/emotions feel that before my mind can discern what in my environment has made me feel helpless.
  14. I feel impotent or helpless or having no capacity to contribute; I don’t like being just a spectator.
  15. I feel like an object, like someone is staring at me, like I’m just there for their entertainment.  I don’t like to be the only contributor.
  16. I sense someone is near, but I can’t see them.
  17. I hear something, but I can’t identify it’s cause.

(Next posts will address “Assessment” and “Action”.)